British Holiday and Home Parks Association, David Bellamy Conservations Awards

British Holiday and Home Parks Association, David Bellamy Conservations Awards

Planting Between Pitches and Formal Garden Areas

Planting Between Pitches and Formal Garden Areas

Planting around pitches is a great way to visually break up your park, help with zoning and give added interest and privacy. It can also be used to ensure that buildings and other structures such as fuel tanks sit well within the park and are well screened. This type of planting can also be a real winner for wildlife by providing food and shelter for insects and birds.

The type of flowers, shrubs and trees you put in will be determined by your location and the amount of space you have to play with, but, wherever possible, please use local native species that provide nectar for pollinating insects and seeds and berries for the birds. Fruiting shrubs, such as Hawthorns, Blackthorn and Elder are good choices. Rambling roses, honeysuckles and night-scented stocks are also ideal candidates. Please also leave patches of nettles and brambles for the caterpillars, and you can really bring in the butterflies and other insects by planting a butterfly-bar using plants such as buddleia. Use signage to explain what you are doing (and to stop people complaining!).

Although well-manicured lawns and flowerbeds planted with exotics are a relative desert in wildlife terms, there are many ways that you can ensure that they too buzz with biodiversity. Create your planting scheme using native shrubs and flowers – interspersed with exotics if you want – and why not try incorporating less-structured ‘informal’ areas (e.g. long grass areas and wet boggy patches) to create extra wildlife interest.

We understand that parks have to abide by various rules regarding how close planting can come to caravans and lodges etc. However, many parks have found that if they enter into dialogue with their environmental health officers, then they can get him or her ‘onside’ and maximise the amount of planting allowed.

More information:

  • For more information on local flora and a list of reputable wildflower seed suppliers see www.floralocale.org.
  • Click here for an in depth article on boosting biodiversity on your park, complete with examples of what parks are doing
  • Click here for an in depth article on making the horticultural management of your park as green as possible.