British Holiday and Home Parks Association, David Bellamy Conservations Awards

British Holiday and Home Parks Association, David Bellamy Conservations Awards

Boundary Features

Boundary Features

The external and internal boundaries of your park are vital, not just as homes and hiding places for all sorts of wildlife, but also to help make your park blend into its surroundings. If you already have old walls or hedges on and around your park, these should be carefully maintained and enhanced (traditionally if possible). Hedges in particular should not be over trimmed or trimmed too regularly and, if possible, should be hand-layered – this will cause the minimum of damage to wildlife (why not get in a group such as the BTCV to help?). Remember to cut or trim after your wildlife has enjoyed the berries and not during the nesting season. Hard boundary features should also, where possible, be planted with appropriate flora (e.g. climbers on fences). Fences should be preserved using low-impact chemicals.

If you are planning to introduce new boundary features please consider a natural boundary such as a hedge. Use hedging plants from your locality and try and plant several different species (e.g. Buckthorn, Dogwood and Hazel). Hedges with both shrub and taller tree layers have been found to be particularly good for birds. Leylandii hedges make good barriers, but do not have a high wildlife value. If you have one on site, why not plant a native hedge in front of it that will eventually take its place? If you have to put in a ‘hard’ boundary feature please make sure it is in a locally appropriate style (e.g. a Cornish hedge or a drystone wall, depending on where you are located). Remember that building a boundary such as a drystone wall is a great opportunity to employ a local craftsperson.

To maximise the wildlife benefit of any boundary, leave a wild border alongside it on one or both sides (e.g. a beetle bank alongside a hedge or a run of nettles and brambles left to run wild).

More information:

  • Click here for an in depth article on boosting biodiversity on your park, complete with examples of what parks are doing