British Holiday and Home Parks Association, David Bellamy Conservations Awards

British Holiday and Home Parks Association, David Bellamy Conservations Awards

Kelling Heath

Kelling Heath

Water and energy are the two key ‘sustainability challenges’ facing parks and Kelling Heath Holiday Park has tackled both in the refurbishment of one of its amenity blocks. The North Norfolk park has invested £180,000 installing environmentally friendly equipment which will harness the power of solar energy and save the equivalent of six-and-a-half touring caravans full of water every year.

Kelling Heath is already internationally recognised for its contribution to environmentally-friendly tourism, thanks to initiatives that include its successful red squirrel breeding programme and the management of its rare habitats. It is, however, not a park to rest on its laurels. "With green tourism and environmental awareness at the top of everyone’s agenda, we thought it was time to see what we might also do to manage our resources in a more effective and environmentally sustainable way," says park manager Mark Durrant. "This is the first time we have incorporated this type of sustainable technology, and we will be monitoring its success to see if it is something we could be applying in other areas – such as the health club, or the main lounge areas."

The new facility block boasts three environmentally friendly features – rainwater harvesting, solar water heating, and a ground source air exchange that uses a system of air-filled underground pipes and a heat exchanger to provide either heating or air conditioning as required.

"Rainwater is collected from the roof via the guttering and then directed into a 6,000 litre holding tank underground," said Mr Durrant. "From there it can be supplied through to all the toilets and urinals." The collection and use of rainwater is expected to save 119,600 litres of water a year. It is estimated that the solar heating for the showers could save enough electricity to prevent 5739kg of carbon dioxide being released into the atmosphere annually.

Kelling Heath